When the next rail and Tube strikes are and all the planned walkouts in July and August

The UK’s summer of travel disruption is showing no signs of easing, with a series of further strikes planned for August.

Walkouts will affect rail services around the UK, as well as separate action which will severely impact the London Underground.

On Wednesday 27 July around 80 per cent of trains around the country were canceled in the most recent strike, following a series of major actions in June.

Here’s everything you need to know about the train and Tube strikes coming up, and why they are happening.

When are the next train strikes?

Aslef union members at eight train operators are staging a strike on Saturday 30 July after talks broke down over pay.

It is expected 5,500 members of staff will walk out, on a day when Birmingham will be hosting a packed schedule of events for the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

This includes the marathon, which will mean many city center roads will be closed to road traffic.

The train companies affected by the strike are:

  • London Overground
  • Greater Anglia
  • Great Western Railway
  • Hull Trains
  • LNER
  • London Northwestern Railway
  • Southeastern
  • West Midlands Railway

The same union is staging a further walkout on Saturday 13 August, involving train drivers at nine rail companies:

  • Avanti West Coast
  • CrossCountry
  • Greater Anglia
  • Great Western Railway
  • Hull Trains
  • LNER
  • London Overground
  • Southeastern
  • West Midlands Trains
Strikes have caused widespread disruption on UK rail services this summer (Photo: AP)

The Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) is also staging strikes for Thursday 18 August spirit Saturday 20 August.

These major walkouts are expected to include 40,000 workers – around 20,000 from Network Rail, including signaling and track maintenance workers – and the remainder from 14 train operating companies.

This means the scale of disruption is likely to be similar to the debilitating walkouts in June, which involved 13 operators – here are the companies involved:

  • Chiltern Railways
  • Cross Country Trains
  • Greater Anglia
  • LNER
  • East Midlands Railway
  • c2c
  • Great Western Railway
  • Northern Trains
  • South Eastern
  • South Western Railway
  • TransPennine Express
  • Avanti West Coast
  • West Midlands Trains
  • GTR (including Gatwick Express)
  • London Overground
  • Great Western Railway
  • Hull Trains
  • London Northwestern Railway

When are the next Tube strikes?

Workers on the London Underground are set to stage a 24-hour strike on Friday 19 August.

The RMT union said the walkout has been prompted by TfL’s “refusal” to share details of a draft government proposal for funding the transport system.

It added that it is giving TfL until 2 August to give assurances on jobs, pensions and working conditions.

The announcement comes one day before the separate 24-hour RMT walkout affecting 14 rail companies.

Workers on the London Underground are to stage a 24-hour walkout on 19 August (Photo: Getty Images)

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said: “Our members will once again take to picket lines in this important dispute over pensions, jobs and conditions.

“They have been messed around by TfL and Mayor Sadiq Khan. And to add insult to injury, they have not seen the details of this funding letter from the government.

“Unless there can be assurances made about jobs, pensions and detrimental changes to working conditions, then our strike on 19 August will go ahead.”

More on Strikes

Why are rail workers striking?

The RMT is calling for a pay rise for its workers of at least seven per cent, which is still below the current inflation rate of 9.4 per cent.

Union leaders have rejected a “paltry” four per cent pay rise offer from Network Rail for the remainder of the year and a possible four per cent pay rise next year if rail workers accepted changes in job conditions. The union has said it will keep launching strike action if the Government refuses to back down.

Mr Lynch has described strike action as “the only course open to us,” and insisted “that this dispute will continue for as long as it takes”.

He said: “The offer from Network Rail represents a real terms pay cut for our members and the paltry sum is conditional on RMT members agreeing to drastic changes in their working lives.”

When the Aslef walkout on 13 August was announced Mick Whelan, the union’s general secretary, said that “strikes are always the last resort”.

However, he added: “Many of our members, who were the men and women who moved key workers and goods around the country during the pandemic, have not had a pay rise since 2019.

“With inflation running at north of 10% that means those drivers have had a real-terms pay cut over the last three years. We want an increase in line with the cost of living – we want to be able to buy, in 2022, what we could buy in 2021.

“It’s not unreasonable to ask your employer to make sure you’re not worse off for three years in a row. Especially as the train companies are doing very nicely, thank you, out of Britain’s railways – with handsome profits, dividends for shareholders, and big salaries for managers – and train drivers don’t want to work longer for less.”

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