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Viktor Bout

Viktor Bout, an international arms dealer, was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, in 1967. In the early 1990s, he began working for the Russian military intelligence agency, the GRU. He then set up his own arms-dealing business, which flourished during the wars in Afghanistan and Angola. By the mid-2000s, Bout was supplying weapons to both sides in the conflicts in Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2006, he was arrested in Thailand on charges of conspiring to sell arms to the Colombian rebel group FARC. He was extradited to the United States in 2010 and sentenced to 25 years in prison.
Viktor Colombian

Viktor Bout is a Russian arms dealer. He is thought to have supplied arms to various militant groups, including the Taliban and the FARC. He was arrested in Thailand in 2008 and extradited to the United States in 2010. He was convicted of conspiracy to provide material support to a terrorist organization in 2012 and is currently serving a 25-year prison sentence.

In 2006, the United Nations Security Council added Viktor Bout, a Russian national, to its sanctions list. The UN said at the time that Bout was “associated with illicit arms transfers” and was “ending up in the hands of groups and persons posing a threat to international peace and security.”

In 2008, the U.S. Department of the Treasury also placed sanctions on Bout, saying he had “provided material support to the Taliban and other terrorist organizations.”

Bout, who was born in 1967, is a former Soviet military officer. He started his own air cargo business in the 1990s, and his fleet of aircraft was used by the United Nations and the U.S. government, among others.

Bout was arrested in Thailand in 2008 and extradited to the United States in 2010. He was convicted of conspiracy to kill U.S. citizens, and sentenced to 25 years in prison in 2012.

Bout’s supporters have said that he is a victim of political persecution. They point to the fact that he was never convicted of actually selling weapons to anyone, and say that he was only convicted of conspiring to do so.

Bout’s case is currently before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. His lawyers have argued that he did not receive a fair trial, and that the evidence against him was insufficient.

In the world of international arms dealers, there are few as notorious – or as elusive – as Viktor Bout. For more than two decades, Bout has been accused of arming conflict zones across the globe, from Africa to the Middle East. U.S. intelligence officials have linked him to arms sales to the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and he is under indictment in the United States on charges of conspiracy to kill Americans.

Bout, who is of Russian origin, first rose to prominence in the early 1990s, during the Soviet Union’s collapse. He quickly established himself as a key player in the murky world of international arms dealing, using his fleet of Soviet-era cargo planes to transport weapons to hot spots around the world.

In the years since, Bout has been linked to a host of illicit arms deals. In 2004, for example, he was named in a United Nations report as being involved in illegal arms shipments to Liberia. In 2006, he was arrested in Thailand on suspicion of trying to sell arms to the Colombian rebel group FARC.

Bout has always denied any wrongdoing, and has evaded justice for years. He was arrested in 2008 in a joint U.S.-Thai sting operation, but was released on bail and fled Thailand before he could be extradited to the United States. He was eventually arrested in Russia in 2010, but was released on bail and has since disappeared.

Bout remains a shadowy figure, and it is unclear where he is currently hiding. But there is no doubt that he is one of the world’s most wanted men.

Viktor Bout was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan on January 13, 1967. He is a Russian arms dealer. In the 1990s, he amassed a fortune by selling weapons to rebel groups in Africa and the Middle East. He has been dubbed the “Merchant of Death” for his role in the international arms trade.

Bout’s arms-dealing career began in the early 1990s, after the collapse of the Soviet Union. He started out selling weapons to the Tajikistani government. He then began selling arms to private companies and individuals in Russia. In 1994, he set up his own arms-dealing business, called Transavia.

In the mid-1990s, Bout began selling arms to rebel groups in Africa. He sold weapons to the Revolutionary United Front in Sierra Leone, the Angolan rebel group UNITA, and the Taliban in Afghanistan. In 1996, he was arrested in Belgium on suspicion of arms smuggling. He was released without charge.

In the late 1990s, Bout expanded his arms-dealing business to the Middle East. He sold weapons to the Iraqi government, as well as to various rebel groups in the region. In 2001, the United Nations imposed sanctions on Bout’s businesses.

In the early 2000s, Bout’s arms-dealing activities attracted the attention of the United States intelligence community. In 2004, he was arrested in Bangkok, Thailand, on suspicion of attempting to sell arms to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). He was extradited to the United States in 2010, and is currently awaiting trial on charges of conspiracy to provide material support to a terrorist organization.

Bout’s story was the basis for the 2005 film Lord of War, starring Nicolas Cage. Please include the following points:

1. Viktor Bout, the Russian arms dealer

2. How he became one of the world’s most wanted men

3. His downfall and eventual capture

Viktor Bout, the Russian arms dealer, is one of the world’s most wanted men. He is accused of selling arms to some of the world’s most dangerous regimes and terrorist organizations. He is also accused of aiding and abetting the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Bout has been on the run from authorities for years. He was finally captured in Thailand in 2008 and extradited to the United States in 2010. He is currently awaiting trial in New York.

Bout’s trial is expected to shed light on the shadowy world of international arms dealing. It will also be a test of the U.S. justice system’s ability to bring to justice a man who is accused of arming some of the world’s most dangerous regimes and terrorist organizations.

Viktor Bout is a former Russian military officer and arms dealer. He is believed to have supplied arms to various terrorist groups and dictators around the world. He was arrested in 2008 in Thailand and was extradited to the United States in 2010. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison in 2012.

Viktor Bout was an international arms dealer, and has been referred to as the “merchant of death”. He was arrested in Thailand in 2008 and extradited to the United States in 2010. He pleaded guilty in 2011 to conspiracy to kill U.S. citizens and officials, and was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

Bout was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, Soviet Union (now in Tajikistan). His father was a military officer, and his family was of Russian descent. He served in the Soviet Army from 1986 to 1991, and was trained as a translator and a pilot. He later began working for air cargo companies in the Middle East.

In the early 1990s, Bout began selling weapons to African countries. He later expanded his business to include selling weapons to the Taliban, al-Qaida, and other terrorist organizations. He was nicknamed the “merchant of death” for his willingness to sell weapons to anyone, regardless of their political or moral beliefs.

In 2008, Bout was arrested in Thailand on suspicion of arms trafficking. He was extradited to the United States in 2010, and pleaded guilty in 2011 to conspiracy to kill U.S. citizens and officials. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

Bout’s case highlights the global arms trade, and the ease with which arms dealers can operate. Bout was able to sell weapons to some of the most notorious terrorist organizations in the world, and his case demonstrates the need for better regulation of the arms trade.

Viktor Bout is a Russian national and arms dealer. He is notable for supplying weapons to various groups in countries in conflict and has been dubbed the “Merchant of Death”.

Bout was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, Soviet Union (now Tajikistan). He is a fluent Russian speaker and also speaks English and Spanish. He served in the Soviet Army from 1984 to 1991, rising to the rank of captain. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Bout set up several businesses in Moscow, including a air charter company called Air Cess.

In the early 1990s, Bout began supplying weapons to conflicts in Africa, the Middle East and Central America. He has been linked to arms shipments to the Taliban in Afghanistan, the Revolutionary United Front in Sierra Leone and the Colombian rebel group FARC.

In 2004, Bout was arrested in Thailand on charges of conspiring to sell arms to the terrorist group FARC. He was extradited to the United States in 2010 and sentenced to 25 years in prison in 2012.

Bout’s story was the basis for the film Lord of War, starring Nicolas Cage.

Viktor Anatolyevich Bout (Russian: Ви́ктор Анатольевич Бут) is a Russian arms dealer. He is alleged to have sold weapons to various groups in Angola, Liberia, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Colombia. He has been under United Nations sanctions since 2004.

Bout was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, Soviet Union (now in Tajikistan). His father was a military officer and his mother was a schoolteacher. He has two brothers and a sister. He graduated from the Military Institute of Foreign Languages in Moscow in 1988. He then served in the Soviet Army as an intelligence officer in the Far East. He speaks Russian, English, French and Spanish.

Bout began his arms dealing business in the early 1990s, after the fall of the Soviet Union. He is alleged to have sold weapons to various rebel groups in Africa, including the Revolutionary United Front in Sierra Leone and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola. He is also alleged to have sold weapons to the leftist guerrilla group Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC).

In 2004, the United Nations Security Council imposed sanctions on Bout, freeze his assets and banned him from travel. In 2006, the United States imposed sanctions on Bout, barring him from doing business with any American company. In 2010, Bout was arrested in Bangkok, Thailand, on charges of conspiring to sell arms to the FARC. He was extradited to the United States in 2012 and is currently awaiting trial.

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