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Hackaday Podcast 196: Flexing Hard PCBs, Dangers of White Filament, and the Jetsons’ Kitchen Computer

On this week’s Hackaday podcast we’re talking about flexible printed circuit boards, the dangers of white filament, and the Jetsons’ kitchen computer. We’re also taking a look at the new Raspberry Pi Zero W and its capabilities.
week's filament

We start off with a look at the recent news including the announcement of the Raspberry Pi Zero W, a $10 board with built in WiFi and Bluetooth. We also take a look at a project that turns an E Ink display into a low power, always-on display for your Raspberry Pi.

Next up is a look at the open source design for a flexible printed circuit board that can be used in a variety of applications. We also take a look at a project that uses an adaptation of this design to create a low cost, high quality multimeter.

Back to the news, we take a look at a new Kickstarter campaign for the HEVO PowerPad, a device that wirelessly charges your laptop. We also talk about the dangers of using white filament in your 3D printer, and the potential for it to release harmful chemicals into the air.

Finally we take a walk down memory lane and take a look at a classic episode of the Jetsons where they get a kitchen computer. We also talk about a recent project that replicates this classic episode with a modern twist.

This week on the Hackaday Podcast, [Shauna] and [Mike] are here to talk about all the hardware news from the past week. We start with PCBs that flex, and how that might not be a terrible idea for wearable electronics. After that it’s on to a discussion of the potential dangers of white filament, and how one company is pioneering the field of kitchen computers.

As always, we also have the latest Hackaday Tip Line and Ask Hackaday questions to answer.

flexible pcb

In this episode we discuss:

How flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) can be used in wearable electronics

The potential dangers of white PLA filament

How one company is using kitchen computers to help people with disabilities

The latest Hackaday Tip Line and Ask Hackaday questions

resources:

Hackaday Podcast 196: Flexing Hard PCBs, Dangers of White Filament, and the Jetsons’ Kitchen Computer

Flexible Printed Circuit Board

White PLA Filament

Kitchen Computer

In Hackaday Podcast 196, [Laen] and [Dan] talk about how hard it is to fabricate flexible PCBs without damaging them, the dangers of white filament, and the kitchen computer from the Jetsons.

[Laen] has been working on a project that involves fabricating flexible PCBs. He’s having a lot of trouble getting them to stay in shape while he’s working on them.

[Dan] brought up the topic of white filament. He’s been using it for a while and has had some issues with it. White filament is more prone to clogging than other colors, and it can be hard to tell when it’s actually done printing.

[Laen] and [Dan] also talked about the kitchen computer from the Jetsons. [Laen] was surprised to learn that the computer was actually a functioning appliance in the kitchen, and not just a prop.

You can listen to the full episode here:

Hackaday Podcast 196: Flexing Hard PCBs, Dangers of White Filament, and the Jetsons’ Kitchen Computer

Welcome to Hackaday Podcast 196. This week we chat about PCBs that can bend and flex, the dangers of white filament, and the Jetsons’ kitchen computer.

While PCBs have been able to flex for some time now, there are still plenty of applications where a more rigid board is needed. But what if your board could be both rigid and flexible? A new material called Graphene Nanoribbon (GNR) is making this possible.

GNR is a one-atom-thick layer of carbon that is bonded together in a zig-zag pattern. This gives it some amazing properties, including the ability to conduct electricity and act as a barrier to water. It’s also incredibly strong and flexible.

This makes GNR ideal for use in flexible PCBs. Unlike traditional PCBs, which use a layer of copper, GNR can be printed directly onto the substrate. This makes for a thinner, lighter, and more flexible board.

GNR is still in the early stages of development, but it has already been used to create some impressive devices. One example is a flexible e-reader that can be rolled up and put in your pocket.

While GNR holds a lot of promise, there are also some potential dangers. One of the biggest concerns is that GNR could be used to create “White Filament”.

White Filament is a type of 3D printing filament that is made from a mix of plastic and metal. It’s incredibly strong and has a very high melting point. This makes it perfect for creating weapons and other objects that could be used to cause harm.

So far, there have been no reports of White Filament being used for malicious purposes. But given the potential dangers, it’s important to be aware of the risks.

The final topic we discuss on the podcast is the Jetsons’ kitchen computer. In the classic cartoon, the Jetsons lived in a future where everything was automated. This included their kitchen, which was run by a computer named “Rosie”.

While we may not be quite at the point where our kitchens are run by computers, there are some pretty amazing devices out there that can help automate your cooking.

One example is the “Tasty One Top”. This smart cooking device connects to your phone and provides step-by-step instructions for cooking a meal. It also has sensors that can monitor the temperature, time, and doneness of your food.

The Tasty One Top is just one example of how kitchen technology is evolving. As we move closer to the future depicted in the Jetsons, it’s likely that more and more kitchens will be equipped with similar devices.

That’s all for this week’s episode. Thanks for listening!

This week on the Hackaday podcast we’re talking about flexible printed circuit boards, the dangers of 3D printing with white filament, and the kitchen computer from The Jetsons.

Flexible printed circuit boards are becoming more popular as electronics get smaller and more portable. But there are some trade-offs to consider when using them.

3D printing with white filament can be dangerous because the material is highly reflective and can cause eye damage.

The kitchen computer from The Jetsons was ahead of its time, but some of the ideas it depicted are becoming reality. We discuss how the kitchen of the future might work.

Welcome to Hackaday Podcast 196. This week we’re talking about how to flex printed circuit boards without breaking them, the dangers of using white filament in 3D printing, and the kitchen computer from the Jetsons.

First up, we’re talking about how to flex printed circuit boards without breaking them. If you’ve ever tried to flex a PCB and had it snap in half, you know the frustration. But with a little careful design and some attention to the material, you can make a PCB that’s flexible enough to bend without breaking.

Next, we’re talking about the dangers of using white filament in 3D printing. White filament is one of the most popular choices for 3D printing, but it can be dangerous. The problem is that white filament reflects light, which can cause eye damage. So if you’re going to use white filament, be sure to wear eye protection.

Finally, we’re talking about the kitchen computer from the Jetsons. The Jetsons is a classic cartoon from the 60s that featured a family with a lot of futuristic gadgets. One of those gadgets was a kitchen computer that could do things like make breakfast and do the dishes. Today, we’re starting to see kitchen computers that can do those things and more. So if you’re looking for a kitchen upgrade, consider a kitchen computer.

That’s all for this week. Thanks for listening!

If you’ve ever wanted to make something flexible, you know that standard PCBs just won’t cut it. But what can you do? In this episode of the Hackaday Podcast, we’re talking about making flex boards. We also delve into the world of 3D printing filaments, and take a look at the kitchen computer from The Jetsons.

Flexible PCBs

Flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) are designed to be bent, folded, or otherwise shaped, without breaking. This makes them perfect for wearable electronics, or any time you need a bit of give in your circuit.

There are a few different ways to make a flex PCB. The most common is to use a thin, flexible substrate, such as polyimide. This can be tricky to work with, as it’s easy to accidentally puncture the thin material.

Another option is to use a standard PCB, but add in some “flex zones”. These are areas where the trace width is increased, to allow for more flexibility.

If you want to get really fancy, you can also use “active” flexing, which uses special components that can bend without breaking. This is the most expensive option, but it can be worth it for high-end applications.

3D Printing Filaments

There are all sorts of materials that you can use to 3D print, including metals, plastics, and even wood. But which one should you use?

There are a few things to consider when choosing a filament. One is the cost – some materials, like gold, are quite expensive. Another is the strength – some filaments are very strong, while others are quite brittle.

And then there’s the color. Many filaments are available in a range of colors, but some are only available in white. This can be a problem if you want your prints to be a different color.

If you’re using a white filament, be aware that it can discolor over time. This is especially true if it’s exposed to sunlight or other strong light sources.

The Jetsons’ Kitchen Computer

In the 1960s TV show The Jetsons, the family had a kitchen computer that would do all sorts of household tasks, like making dinner and doing the laundry.

While we don’t yet have anything quite as advanced as the Jetsons’ kitchen computer, there are a few products that come close.

The first is the June Oven, which is a smart oven that can cook food using preset recipes. It’s not quite as versatile as the kitchen computer from The Jetsons, but it’s a start.

Another option is the Pantelligent, which is a smart frying pan that can help you cook the perfect steak. It’s not quite as all-encompassing as the Jetsons’ kitchen computer, but it can certainly make your life easier.

And then there’s the Chefsteps Joule, which is a sous vide machine that can cook food to perfection. Again, it’s not quite as versatile as the Jetsons’ kitchen computer, but it’s a very useful tool.

So, while we don’t yet have a kitchen computer that can do everything, we are slowly but surely getting there.

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