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Google Doodle Honors Solar Energy Pioneer ‘Sun Queen’ Mária Telkes – CNET

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In the world of renewable energy, solar power is one of the most popular forms of energy. Solar power is clean, sustainable, and abundant. It’s no wonder that solar energy is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States.

One of the pioneers of solar power is Hungarian scientist Mária Telkes. Telkes was born in Hungary in 1897 and emigrated to the United States in 1923. She earned her PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Budapest in 1927.

Telkes was a brilliant scientist and is credited with inventing the first solar-powered still, which was used to distill water and make it safe to drink. She also developed a solar-powered air conditioner and refrigerator. These inventions led her to be nicknamed the “Sun Queen”.

Telkes’ work was instrumental in the development of solar power. She is one of the reasons why solar power is a viable form of energy today. Google is honoring her with a Doodle on what would have been her 121st birthday.

Telkes was a true visionary and her work has inspired many scientists and engineers to continue to develop solar power. She is an inspiration to us all and her work has made a significant impact on the world.
solar power

Maria Telkes, the “Sun Queen” and one of the most influential solar energy pioneers of the 20th century, was honored with a Google Doodle on Wednesday.

Born in Budapest, Hungary in 1897, Telkes was a student of chemical engineering and went on to get her PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Dresden. Her work on solar energy began in the 1930s, when she researched methods of using solar power to desalinate seawater. In the 1940s, she moved to the United States to work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she developed the first solar-powered desalination plant and the first solar-powered car heater.

In the 1950s, Telkes turned her attention to domestic solar heating, and devised a system that used solar heat to warm a house during the day and then stored the heat in rock bins for use at night. This system was installed in a house in Dover, Massachusetts, and was so successful that it was later adapted for use in senior citizen homes and hospitals.

Telkes continued to work on solar energy projects until her retirement in 1967, and she remained an active advocate for solar power until her death in 1995. Her work helped make solar power a viable and increasingly popular option for generating electricity and heat, and her legacy continues to inspire scientists and engineers working on the cutting edge of renewable energy today.

Maria Telkes, the “Sun Queen,” was a solar energy pioneer whose work helped make solar power a viable option for generating electricity. She was born in Hungary in 1897 and came to the United States in 1922. Telkes was a chemist and inventor who developed the first solar-powered still and the first solar-powered air-Conditioning system. Her work paved the way for solar power to be used as a viable energy source.

Solar power is one of the most promising renewable energy sources because it is abundant and does not produce greenhouse gas emissions. Maria Telkes was a pioneer in solar energy research and her work helped make solar power a viable option for generating electricity.

Telkes was born in Hungary in 1897 and came to the United States in 1922. She was a chemist and inventor who developed the first solar-powered still and the first solar-powered air-conditioning system. Her work paved the way for solar power to be used as a viable energy source.

Solar power is a renewable energy source that is abundant and does not produce greenhouse gas emissions. Solar power is an attractive option for generating electricity because it has the potential to provide a significant amount of energy without damaging the environment.

Maria Telkes was a pioneers in solar energy research and her work was instrumental in making solar power a viable option for generating electricity. com

In the 1930s, Hungarian physicist Mária Telkes helped develop one of the first solar-powered homes. Nearly a century later, her work is being celebrated with a Google Doodle.

Born on December 1, 1907, in Budapest, Telkes was a champion long-distance runner in her youth. She went on to study physics and chemistry at the city’s Loránd Eötvös University, where she became the first woman in Hungary to earn a doctorate in thermodynamics.

After working as a research fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Telkes returned to Budapest in 1936. There, she met her future husband, fellow physicist Jenő Wigner, with whom she would collaborate on several projects.

One of those projects was the development of a solar-powered house, which they designed in the late 1930s. The house, which had a south-facing solar collector, was built in the town of Pécel and was occupied by tenants for several years.

In the 1940s, Telkes emigrated to the United States, where she took a teaching position at Dhahran College in Saudi Arabia. She later returned to the US, settling in Dover, Massachusetts.

In the 1950s, Telkes turned her attention to the field of solar thermal energy, developing a solar-powered water heater that could be used in homes. Her work in this area led to the development of the Telkes Solar House, built in 1953 in Dover.

The house, which was featured in Life magazine, had a solar collector on its roof that was used to heat water and air. The heated air was then used to warm the house in the winter.

In the 1960s, Telkes helped develop a solar-powered desalination plant in Arizona. She also worked on a number of other solar energy projects, including a solar car and a solar-powered medical supplies fridge.

Telkes retired from her post at the Dover Sun Lab in 1974 but continued to work on solar energy projects until her death in 1995.

The Google Doodle honoring Telkes was created by artist Olivia Huynh and animated by Google Doodler Ryan Germick. It features Telkes standing in front of one of her solar-powered homes, with the sun shining behind her.

Solar energy is one of the most renewable and clean energy sources available, and Google is honoring one of the pioneers in harnessing its power.

Mária Telkes was born on this day in 1880 in Hungary. She dedicated her life to science and made several important contributions, but she’s best known for her work in solar energy.

Telkes was the first to develop a solar-powered still, which could distill water and produce ethanol. This was a crucial development, as it demonstrated that solar power could be used to generate fuel.

She also developed the first solar-powered home heating system. This system used solar radiation to convert water into steam, which was then used to heat the home.

Both of these inventions proved that solar energy could be used to power homes and generate fuel, making it a key part of the renewable energy mix.

Google is honoring Telkes today with a Doodle on its homepage. com

When we think of solar energy, we often think of modern solar panels that cover the roofs of homes and businesses. But the history of solar energy goes back much further than that. Solar energy has been used for centuries to heat homes and cook food. And one of the pioneers of solar energy was a woman named Mária Telkes.

Born in Hungary in 1900, Mária Telkes was a scientist who devoted her life to researching alternative sources of energy. She was particularly interested in solar energy and how it could be used to heat homes and provide other forms of energy. In the 1930s, she moved to the United States to continue her research.

During World War II, Telkes worked on a team that developed a solar-powered desalination plant. This plant could turn seawater into freshwater, which was vitally important during the war. After the war, Telkes continued her work on solar energy.

In the 1950s, she developed a solar-powered heating system for homes. This system used a network of pipes to circulate solar-heated water through a home. The system was used in a number of homes and was even featured in a Life magazine article.

Telkes’s work helped to make solar energy a viable option for heating homes and providing other forms of energy. And her work was recognized by Google today with a Doodle on what would have been her 117th birthday.

On Saturday, Google Doodle celebrated the 115th birthday of Hungarian-born solar energy pioneer Mária Telkes with a special doodle featuring one of her most iconic inventions, the solar-powered “Thermo-Electron Home” in Dover, Massachusetts.

Born in Buda, Hungary in1900, Telkes was interested in chemistry and physics from a young age. She went on to study at the Nagykenyi Lukacs Technical College for Girls, where she designed her first solar thermal system to collect energy from the sun to heat water. After moving to the United States in 1929, Telkes continued her work on solar energy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she earned her master’s degree in 1930 and her doctorate in 1940.

At MIT, Telkes developed the first solar-powered still, which could distill water using only the heat of the sun. This invention was crucial for the development of solar-powered desalination plants, which are still used today to provide clean drinking water in many parts of the world.

In 1947, Telkes joined the faculty of Dover State Teachers College (now the University of New Hampshire) where she designed and built the Thermo-Electron Home, the first house in the US powered by solar energy. The home was equipped with a solar-powered water heater, an air-conditioning unit, and a ventilation system that all ran on electricity generated by the sun.

After retiring from teaching in 1965, Telkes continued to consult on solar energy projects around the world until her death in 1995. Today, her work is celebrated as an early example of sustainable living and her legacy continues to inspire new generations of scientists and engineers to develop cleaner, more efficient sources of energy.

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